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Do Law Enforcement Have a Biased in Cycling Accidents?

Two police officers responding to a traffic accident involving two young women and a cycling accident.

Cycling Accidents

Everyone likes to think that when an officer arrives on the scene of an accident, they look at the whole situation with an objective eye to best gather the facts of an accident. While there are certainly some officers that do this, when it comes to cycling accidents, it is no secret that there is a certain level of bias against the cyclist by law enforcement officers.

What’s the Difference?

This bias comes from the same place that cycling accidents often come from – a lack of information. When it comes to car accidents, the whole scene is a familiar one for law enforcement officers. However, like other motorists, many law enforcement officers aren’t exactly well-versed in the laws, common practices, or even the behavior of cyclists. To some, cyclists on the road are an unknown factor that makes them uncomfortable. It is easier for a law enforcement officer to believe a cyclist caused an accident over a motorist that has a clear-cut sort of behavior on the road.

Unfortunately, what this means for the cyclist is a poorly documented crash scene. Law Enforcement will state the facts as best they can, but lacking the knowledge of cyclist behavior, sometimes they don’t capture the whole picture. This can make receiving compensation for an accident difficult for the cyclist. It is something that needs to be addressed sooner rather than later as more cyclists take to the road and laws are constantly constructed to protect them. However, until then, the cyclist will need to be responsible for documenting their own accidents if possible.

Legal Help

If you have been in a cycling accident and need legal representation that understands, contact us today. As a cyclist himself, Gary Brustin and his law office understand what cyclists go through. If you were badly hurt, let him help you recover the compensation that you require.

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