The Basic Rules of Locking Up a Bike

Accidents aren’t the only way your bicycle can get damaged or destroyed. If you live in even a moderate-sized city, all you need to do to lose your bicycle is to leave it outside overnight without a lock. It probably won’t be there in the morning. However, if you know the basic rules of locking up a bicycle, then you can keep it safe.

First, you should buy yourself the best bike lock you can afford. A bike chain and combination lock are fine, but they can easily be cut through. A sturdy U-lock is best. Typically, to ward off except the most hardcore bike thieves, all you need to do is put the effort into locking up your bike. However, if you have a new or particularly flashy bike, never leave it locked up outside overnight.

Once you have the lock, you need to know where to lock it up. Bike racks should be your first choice, but you don’t always have the option. The next best option is somewhere that is both unmovable, but also highly visible. You may feel safer locking it up in an alley, but bike thieves are more likely to strike in places where there aren’t a dozen eyes on them at all times. Keep your bike visible and random pedestrians will keep it safe. As for where to lock it, anywhere unmovable is fine, but you need to consult your city ordinances to make sure areas like lamp posts or street signs are legal venues to lock your bike to.

While locking up your bike keeps it safe, it won’t always be safe on the road. If you have been in a cycling accident and need legal representation, contact us today.

Related Articles

Cycling has never been more popular. With COVID-19 leading people to seek socially distanced recreat …

Electric bikes have taken the country by storm, as casual and serious cyclists alike look for new me …

A traffic accident can shake anyone up — even if it’s relatively minor. When you’re on a bicycle an …

The greatest danger to cyclists is those with whom they share the road. Namely, drivers of cars and …

California has given the world many innovative new products and services — and ridesharing is one g …

Cyclists deal with a variety of road hazards: Potholes, unprotected lanes and inattentive motorists, …